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Adopting in North Dakota

Adoption in North Dakota

North Dakota is home to the wide open, desolate Badlands and Theodore Roosevelt National Park. In North Dakota, any adult, married or single, may adopt. Generally, adoptions can not be finalized out of state, and Adopting Parents must use a facilitator from Department of Human Services. Interesting historical fact: the first camera was invented in 1887, and founder, David Henderson, scrambled the state's letters and added a 'k' to name his camera, Kodak.

Home Study Providers in North Dakota

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Adoption Attorneys in North Dakota

2 Adoption Agencies in ND

1 AAAA Attorneys in ND

Academy of Adoption & Assisted Reproduction Attorneys

  • Attorney
    William P. Harrie
    201 N. 5th St., Suite 1800, P.O. Box 2626
    Fargo, ND 58102
    (701) 237-5544
    (701) 280-0762
    Services Offered Assisted Reproduction, Contested Adoption, Domestic Adoption, Intercountry Adoption, Interstate (ICPC) Adoption, Mediation, Egg Donation, Embryo Donation, Surrogacy
  • Agency
    JM
    123 Easy St
    Shoreline, WA 98155
    (555) 555-5555
    jack+org1@pairtreefamily.com

Traveling For Your Adoption in North Dakota

Length of ICPC
in North Dakota

1-30 days

Email: kvorachek@nd.gov

North Dakota adheres to the Interstate Compact On The Placement of Children (ICPC) – a uniform law in all 50 States that establishes procedures for the interstate placement of children. The ICPC also places specific responsibilities on those involved in placing the children. The three principle goals of the ICPC are to:

Protect the children being placed.
Ensure that they receive the services they need.
Facilitate permanent placements for those children who are in state custody

Adoption Law FAQ in North Dakota

Advertising Law Info

  • Can adoptive parents advertise for birth parents?
    Yes.
  • State Advertising Code of Law
    Citation: Cent. Code § 23-16-08; 50-11-06; 50-19-11; 50-12-17

    A person may not advertise, without a license from the Department of Human Services to do so, in any public medium (1) that the person knows of a child who is available for adoption, (2) that the person is willing to accept a child for adoption, or (3) that the person knows of prospective adoptive parents for a child.

Adoption Law Info

Home Study Info

  • Elements of a Home Study for Adoption
    Citation: Admin. Code § 75-03-36-31
    The following information shall be included in the adoption assessment:
    • Motivation for adoption
    • Strengths and challenges of each family member
    • The attitudes and feelings of family members and extended family regarding adoption
    • Evidence of stability of the adoptive parents’ marital or other significant relationships
    • The applicant’s understanding of and plans for assisting a minority child to understand and value his or her racial and cultural background
    • Attitudes of the applicant toward the birth parents and their reasons for placement
    • The applicant’s plan for discussing adoption with the child
    • The applicant’s emotional stability and maturity, including a history of treatment for substance abuse, mental health concerns, abuse or neglect issues, or other issues impacting the applicant’s emotional stability and maturity
    • The applicant’s parenting skills
    • The attitude of the applicant’s birth children or previously adopted children about adoption, if applicable
    • Reports of the physical examination of the applicant or self-disclosure of medical concerns, current within the past 12 months
    • The applicant’s ability to provide financially for the adopted child with or without financial assistance under subsidized adoption, including the availability of health insurance
    • The applicant’s references, including at least five personal and community character references
    • The applicant’s religious preference, if any
    • A description of the applicant’s home and community
    • Plans for child care if the applicant works
    • Plans for care of the child in the event of the death of the applicant after the adoption
    • Results of fingerprint-based criminal history records and child abuse and neglect index checks
    • Recommendations for adoption in regard to number, age, sex, characteristics, and special needs of children best served by the applicants
  • Grounds for Withholding Approval for Adoption
    Citation: Admin. Code § 75-03-36-31
    When an applicant is denied a positive recommendation for adoption, the child-placing agency shall inform the applicant, in writing, of the reasons the child cannot be placed in the applicant’s home.
  • When Home Studies Must Be Completed for Adoption
    Citation: Admin. Code §§ 75-03-36-28; 75-03-36-31
    A child-placing agency may not place a child into an adoptive home without a full adoption assessment being completed on the prospective adoptive parents, including required fingerprint-based criminal history record investigations and child abuse and neglect index investigations.
    The child-placing agency shall require an adoptive family assessment be updated at least every 2 years from the date of completion of the original assessment until a child is placed into the home for the purpose of adoption.
  • Postplacement Study Requirements for Adoption
    Citation: Gen. Stat. § 14-15-11; Admin. Code § 75-03-36-30
    After the filing of a petition to adopt a child, an investigation must be made by a licensed child-placing agency to inquire into the conditions and antecedents of the child being adopted and the petitioner to determine whether the adoptive home is a suitable home for the child and whether the proposed adoption is in the best interests of the child.
    The report of the investigation must contain:
    • A review of the child’s history
    • A preplacement adoption assessment of the petitioner, including a criminal history record investigation
    • A postplacement evaluation of the placement with a recommendation as to the granting of the petition for adoption
    • Any other information the court requires regarding the petitioner or child
    In regulation: The child-placing agency shall:
    • Make continuing supportive services available for children and families following adoptive placement
    • Interview all members of the adoptive family in the family home
    • Have face-to-face visits with the child on a monthly basis primarily in the child’s residence
    • Provide assistance to the adoptive family in completing the legal adoption of the child

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